Thank you to all who supported The Greater good Campaign. Your demonstrated commitment to advancing job creation by preserving higher-education funding is key to creating prosperity in our state. The accomplishments achieved in avoiding deeper cuts to higher education during this legislative budget session are a win for all. A special thank you to our sponsors: Boeing, Davis Wright Tremaine, Microsoft, Rowley Properties, Safeco Insurance and The Bellevue Collection.

 

More applicants make getting into UW tougher this year

This year it was harder to get into the University of Washington for freshmen, even though the university increased the size of the class by 200, including 150 new spots for in-state students.
It got a little harder to get into the University of Washington as a flood of high-school hopefuls submitted applications last winter to become Huskies in fall 2013.
More than 30,000 students applied for freshman admission, an increase of nearly 16 percent from the previous year and the largest pool of applicants ever. "We were taken aback by the increase," said UW admissions director Philip Ballinger.

The full story: By Katherine Long / Seattle Times higher education reporter


Report: Investing in tech programs will pay off for the state

A business group is calling on the Legislature to more fully fund higher education and tech training after its study showed there are 25,000 unfilled high-skill jobs in Washington.
It's never been easy - and it may be getting harder - to find an unemployed computer-science major in Washington state. Just ask Steve Singh, the CEO of a company with 700 job openings worldwide - 300 of them in Washington. "We have a standing discussion with University of Washington computer science - anybody you graduate, we'll take," said Singh, CEO of Redmond-based Concur Technologies. The shortage has been an ongoing issue in Washington, but as the state emerges from the economic downturn, pressure is building to grow college programs that could fill the gap.

The full story: By Katherine Long / Seattle Times higher education reporter


Great Jobs Within Our Reach: Solving the problem of Washington state's growing job skills gap

As reported from the Washington Roundtable website

Washington state would gain 160,000 jobs, spread across many sectors of its economy, if it fills its job skills gap; generating $720 million in new state tax revenues annually. That is the conclusion of a new report from the Roundtable and The Boston Consulting Group. According to the research:
There are 25,000 "acute" unfilled jobs in Washington today - jobs that have been unfilled for three months or more due to a lack of qualified candidates. Eighty percent of these jobs are in high-demand health care and high-skill STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) disciplines such as computer science and engineering.
The gap is projected to grow by another 5,000 jobs per year, reaching 50,000 jobs, by 2017. Ninety percent of those openings will be in health care and STEM roles.
Due to the multiplier effect, filling the job skills gap will generate an additional 110,000 jobs in Washington across many sectors by 2017.
Filling the job skills gap would generate $720 million in annual state tax revenues and $80 million in local tax revenues by 2017.

View the full report
Read the press release
Learn what business and community leaders are saying


New Washington State poll finds overwhelming support for higher education: Majority want funding increased. Voters clearly draw connection between access to higher education and jobs, economic growth, future of state

Olympia - Voters in Washington state overwhelmingly support public higher education and want to see funding for our colleges and universities increased, according to a new poll conducted earlier this month. The survey clearly indicates that support for higher education in Washington State is high, and that residents have a strong connection to our state's colleges and universities, viewing them as important parts of their communities and a key to future economic success and stability.

Read the full press release from Western Advocates


Four years of major funding cuts to higher education

Washington will invest LESS in its public baccalaureate institutions in 2011-13 than it did in 1989-91 (in actual dollars). This is despite the fact that state spending will have grown from $12.7 billion to $32.4 billion and our institutions are serving 32,000 more students. For more information, please click the link below.

Download a PDF of the full presentation

Economic and Societal Impact of Higher Education

The report on this site details the economic, employment and government revenue impact of operations and research of all of the UW's campuses and affiliates. The report was prepared by Tripp Umbach, a nationally recognized consulting firm. For more information, please click the link below.

Download a PDF of the full report

Higher Education Creates Jobs

The UW supports almost 70,000 jobs in the state of Washington including artists, business professionals, construction project managers, doctors, engineers, graphic designers, lawyers, nurses, public servants, teachers and more. For more information, please click the link below.

Download a PDF of the full fact sheet

The UW is the major provider of highly educated workers for Washington. The UW graduates over 12,000 students each year, who then enter our workforce. Among Washington public colleges and institutions, this represents:

40% of all bachelor’s degrees
62% of all master’s degrees
75% of all doctoral degrees
72% of all professional degrees

For more information, please click the link below.

Download a PDF of the full fact sheet

Higher education in Washington:

Graduating from high school:
One-fourth of adults have not earned a diploma. By one measure, the state's high-school graduation rate was 16th lowest in the nation.

Going to college:
Washington lags behind most other states in the total number of bachelor's degrees produced per capita only 40 of every 100 students who start ninth grade enter college on time. Hispanic students are a particular concern; they make up 10 percent of the population but have lower graduation rates, lower scores on standardized tests and attend college at a much lower rate.

Paying for a degree:
Tuition is skyrocketing at the same time that family income is declining. From 1999 to 2009, the median family income declined in constant dollars by 1.9 percent. At the same time, tuition increased in constant dollars by 42.4 percent at public two-year colleges and 39.5 percent at public four-year colleges and universities.

The full report: www.gse.upenn.edu/irhe/srp/washington

Source: "State Policy Leadership Vacuum: Performance and Policy in Washington Higher Education"

$9.1 billion in total economic impact generated by the UW in the state of Washington.

UW supports almost 70,000 direct and indirect jobs and has created 7,600 new jobs (from external funding sources) since 1999.

$618.1 million in tax revenue to state and local governments, including sales, property and business tax payments. For every $1 in state funding allocated to the UW, $1.48 in tax revenue is returned to the state.

$1 invested by the state in the UW generates $22.56 in the total state economy.

12,000 students graduate annually from the UW, and 74% of alumni stay in the state.

$394.5+ million annually in charitable donations, volunteer services and provision of free care is generated by UW staff, faculty and students.


“The Greater Good: The Future of Higher Education in Washington State”
A keynote address by F. A. Blethen Publisher of The Seattle Times. Download the keynote.

Senate Dems' budget plan avoids deeper cuts to education
Senate Democrats will propose a budget Tuesday that spares K-12 and higher education from additional cuts, Senate Ways and Means Chairman Ed Murray said Monday.

Presidents lament budget cuts draining state's universities
Cutbacks to higher education are causing a brain drain at Washington public universities, the presidents of Washington's six four-year higher-education institutions said Wednesday.

The Washington State University Alumni Association has formed WSU Impact, an interactive civic advocacy resource.
It provides opportunities for alumni and friends to join us to support Washington State University and to advocate for higher education.

Senate Dems' budget plan avoids deeper cuts to education
Senate Democrats will propose a budget Tuesday that spares K-12 and higher education from additional cuts, Senate Ways and Means Chairman Ed Murray said Monday.

Shortchanging higher education means lost jobs
Washington will let tens of thousands of jobs get away or go to out-of-state students because of its declining level of support for higher education.

Higher-ed woes tied to state 'leadership vacuum'
A new report by national education experts says Washington politicians have abdicated their leadership role in higher education, leaving the state with a disjointed system that doesn't produce enough bachelor's degrees and forces employers to go out of state to find skilled workers.

The Seattle Times and sponsors begin a year-long campaign in support of higher education. Download the press release.

UW Impact
UW Impact thanks The Seattle Times for embarking on a public service campaign to reinforce the positive effects of state investment in higher education. Informed advocates of the University of Washington.

Western Advocates
Western Advocates is a coalition of WWU alumni, students, faculty and concerned citizens. Please, join us in our efforts to support Western Washington University and higher education in Washington State.

View the campaign’s in-paper ads using the links below.


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KOMO news radio interview with Kate Riley.

John Carlson, host of KOMO news radio's Newsline A.M. invited Frank Blethen to discuss The Seattle Times' Greater good Campaign and the importance of higher-education funding in Washington state. You can listen to the to the December 8, 2011 interview here.

Jeremy's story:
Higher education budget cuts and tuition increases have affected people across Washington state, but students from middle class families have been hit the hardest. Jeremy's parents have not paid any of his tuition, so he's been trying to pay his own way toward his political science degree. This is his story. (4:09)

Ashley's story:
Ashley is the oldest of six children and the first in her family to attend college. Without work study, a Pell Grant, and a State Need Grant, Ashley would not be able to attend Western. More cuts to higher education will make it impossible for students like Ashley to go to college. This is her story. (2:23)

An unprecedented decline in state funding for the UW. (3:17)

The UW is steadfast in its commitment to education and the state. (3:21)

The UW gives back: donations, community service and a $9.1 billion impact on the state economy. (4:48)




Thank you to our co-sponsors